Bitcoin’s Rise And It’s Primordial Origins

Behavioral Economics & The Future of Cryptocurrencies

Abhishek Kothari

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Kelsey Garson On Unsplash.com

“Capitalism is not the simple desire to make a profit. Capitalism is the fantasy that growth can continue at a consistent rate indefinitely. When a child is young, it cannot yet imagine being an adult, so it thinks it will keep on growing forever. The fantasy that you can grow forever is exhilarating, one of the many aspects that make children seem so alive. We live in fantasy, all of us, all of the time, to a greater or lesser extent ” — Jacob Wren, Rich And Poor

“The Internet is the first thing humanity has built that humanity doesn’t understand, the largest experiment in anarchy we have ever had ”— Eric Schmidt, Executive Chairman — Alphabet

Salvator Mundi (savior of the world), a painting by Leonardo da Vinci, was auctioned by Christie on November 15, 2017 for an astronomical value of $450 million. Many claim that the painting is fake and not worth what it was auctioned for. Very telling are the words of Frank Zöllner, a German art historian and professor at Universität Leipzig, who’s written a book on Leonardo as reported in the Huffington Post: “A heavily damaged painting by Leonardo, which was created with the substantial involvement of his workshop after 1507 or even later, achieved a record price, which is significantly higher than the sums that are called for modern masters.”

“Of course, [‘Salvator’] is the symbol of a very unequal, even obscene distribution of wealth in the world,” Zöllner added

That very same week Bitcoin staged a rally that pushed it very close to $8000 USD. The painting and the value of Bitcoin are both a giant step for the business world. They are also icons of obscene inequality and of a deeper malaise in human nature — a vice called greed.

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Abhishek Kothari

Futurist@The Intersection of Finance, Tech & Humanity. Stories of a Global Language: “Money”. Contributor @ Startup Grind, HackerNoon, HBR