The Innovators Oracle

How Innovation Can Benefit From Futurists

Abhishek Kothari

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Dmitri Popov on Unsplash.com

I keep six honest serving men (they taught me all I knew); Theirs names are What and Why and When And How And Where and Who — Rudyard Kipling

Innovators and entrepreneurs, often, become so attached to their ideas that their blind side expands to obscure the whole horizon. Also, unless they are good futurists themselves, it is hard to size the future growth of their market without understanding the mega trends shaping their market. This article lays out the impoetsnve of futurists who can look at a multidisciplinary view of the world and therefore help innovators to overcome their blind sides and to avoid a siloed approach to business problems.

The Role Of A Futurist

In Ancient Greece, an Oracle was a priest or priestess acting as a medium through whom advice or prophecy was sought from the gods in classical antiquity. A

As per the Merriam Webster dictionary, Innovation (noun), for its part, can refer to something new or to a change made to an existing product, idea, or field. One might say that the first telephone was an invention, the first cellular telephone either an invention or an innovation, and the first smartphone an innovation.

A futurist a person who studies the future and makes predictions about it based on current trends and past events. In the UK, the Winton Group — a hedge fund collects data on financial cycles as far back in history as it can. Many believe in the age old aphorism by Mark Twain and in The 1874 edition of “The Gilded Age: A Tale of To-Day” which he co-authored with Charles Dudley Warner:

History never repeats itself, but the Kaleidoscopic combinations of the pictured present often seem to be constructed out of the broken fragments of antique legends.

Now, if you combine them with Twain’s other observation which is that there is no such thing as a new idea, you can understand why someone who can string together the past and the present to extrapolate a highly probable and a less probable but likely…

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Abhishek Kothari

Futurist@The Intersection of Finance, Tech & Humanity. Stories of a Global Language: “Money”. Contributor @ Startup Grind, HackerNoon, HBR